The Witch’s Children series

The Witch’s Children came into my head after I had been for a walk in Hyde Park, London. Perhaps they were there, who knows?

I love Russell Ayto’s witty and vivid illustrations. There’s lots to look at and laugh about.
Between them the three books have been awarded The Nestle Children’s Book Prize Gold Award, the 2008 inaugural Roald Dahl Funny Prize and been short-listed for the Kate Greenaway Medal.
Read some of the reviews of the Witch's Children

The Witch's Children (Short-listed for the Kate Greenaway Medal)

One day in the windy park, the Witch’s three children, the Eldest, the Middle One and the Little One, meet Gemma.  Her toy sailing boat is sinking on the pond.  What better solution than to change her into a frog so that she can swim out and retrieve it?  However, the young witches haven’t learned spell reversal yet so they can’t change her back.

And that’s where the trouble starts.  Everyone  – from the ice cream lady to the park’s squirrels – is caught up in a chain of witchily logical transformations, as The Witch’s Children try to resolve the situation.  But all everybody really wants is to be themselves again.  No one is happy, particularly as the Little One finds it all very funny.

Fortunately, there is someone who can be summoned to sort out the mess: Mum.  And she does. 

Russell Ayto’s wacky illustrations are a delight. He puts so much fun onto every page.

Paperback: 32 pages

Publisher: Orchard Books

Language English

ISBN-10: 1841211141

ISBN-13: 978-1841211145

Dimensions: 29 x 23.6 x 1 cm

 

The Witch's Children and the Queen (Nestle Children’s Book Prize Gold Award)

It’s a rainy day and Gemma is off on the number 16 bus to see the Queen’s soldiers.  The witch’s children go too.  But Gemma has left her money at home so the Eldest One turns her into a goose. She lays a golden egg. That pays her bus fare but it starts the trouble. 

So begins a trail of magical mayhem. The queen is horribly cross when the number 16 bus (now a flying carpet) arrives at her palace causing chaos amongst her soldiers. She is even crosser when her guards are turned into jam tarts. Before the Queen can get the crossest she has ever been in the whole of her long reign, the Little One thinks up a way of summoning help. Mum to the rescue again!

Russell Ayto’s illustrations have packed this book with rain swept fun.  I think my favourite is the queen’s little dog.  See what you think.

Paperback: 32 pages

Publisher: Orchard Books(20 Nov 2008)

Language English

ISBN-10: 1408300729

ISBN-13: 978-1408300725

Dimensions: 29.2 x 23.4 x 0.5 cm

 

The Witch's Children Go to School (winner of the inaugural Roald Dahl Funny Prize)

It is Gemma’s first day at school and she is frightened, particularly of scary Class 3. The Witch’s children stroll by and, as usual, try to help. They turn her into an ogre. But now everyone is scared of her.   Mum comes to the rescue, but not before the whole school has been turned into a fairytale book and the Inspector of Schools into a big cheese: a very smelly one.

I love Russell Ayto’s character packed, zany illustrations. For my favourite I’m torn between the ‘forty fleas’ and the ‘cool tiger’

Paperback: 32 pages

Publisher: Orchard Books(20 Nov 2008)

Language English

ISBN-10: 1408300729

ISBN-13: 978-1408300725

Dimensions: 29.2 x 23.4 x 0.5 cm

 

Reviews

The Witch's Children

This anything-can-happen tale is told with witty text and illustrations and has a satisfyingly reassuring outcome. ”

The Guardian

This book has been wonderfully designed and the text is in perfect harmony with the incredible funny illustrations"

Booktrust Best Books Guide

The Witch's Children and the Queen

An exuberant fantasy……executed with wonderful humour and penmanship. If you want to summon a witch, you cross your eyes, flash your knickers and she’ll appear, saying, “ How many times have I told you not to do that?”

The Sunday Times

Quirky and funny-let us hope the Queen is amused too (and flattered). "

Children’s Bookseller

The chaos and satisfactory resolution are perfectly played out."

The Guardian

The Witch's Children Go to School

An anarchic and colourful riot."

Mail on Sunday

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